Nikolay Starikov: Estonia should pay back the money, for which Peter the Great bought it from Sweden 300 years ago

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Tallinn, the capital of Estonia

June 17, 2015

Nikolay Starikov

The Great Fatherland Party blog

Translated by Kristina Rus

Estonia presented claims for parts of Russia. The other day this Baltic country has declared its intention to unilaterally markup the border with Russia. In the temporary control zone on the border with Russian Federation it plans to install 760 pillars and 412 buoys on the water border. Estonian lawmakers cite the Treaty of Tartu of 1920, according to which Estonia has territorial claims against Russia and claims parts of Pskov region. According to the leader of the party “The Great Fatherland”, Nikolay Starikov, Estonia has selective historic memory, but if you dig deeper, you find that it still belongs to Russia on legal grounds.

Nikolay Starikov

Nikolay Starikov:

“We are asked to respect the international law all the time. It’s a great idea, and I totally agree with that. All we need is to determine from what historical moment we need to start honoring it.

In 1913, Estonia and Latvia were the acknowledged territory of the Russian Empire, which they joined under the various treaties, that no one can question. In particular, it is Nystadt Peace of 1721, concluded between Russia and Sweden, by which Peter the Great paid a few million gold talers for those lands, where the modern Estonia and part of Latvia are located.

I would like to ask, when and where our Estonian partners paid back the money we spent on the acquisition of these territories from Sweden? I am not aware of such historical facts.

After the revolution of 1917, which was a violation of law, the Bolsheviks signed a treaty and recognized the independence of Estonia. In 1920, approximately the same way Ukraine received “independence”. Then in 1940, an agreement was signed with the same Estonia, and it became part of the Soviet Union. After its collapse, Estonia gained independence. But the question is, what starting date we should consider to comply with international legislation, as in 1985 the borders of the Soviet Union and the inalienability of Estonia was undisputed, exactly the same as the territory of the Russian Empire in 1913.

Because our partners constantly seek out those contracts, dates and situations that meet their interests, let’s learn from them. My position is as follows: let the Estonians pay back with inflation over the past 300 years the money paid by Peter the Great, and then we will have no more questions for them.”

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